Exploring information literacy pedagogies through sonic objects #MmITsonic

Join us at Central Saint Martins for this interactive workshop. Participants will be encouraged to experiment with sound, then relate these experiences to teaching practices, strategies and approaches to learning within a context of teaching information literacy. Themes will be emergent on the day, but the workshop design encourages exploration of the following: assumptions about group learning, group dynamics, lived experience of teaching and learning, session design and digital learning.

Anyone who works with students supporting information literacy/academic support or has an interest in pedagogy will benefit from this workshop. Come along and put yourselves in your students shoes for an afternoon and remember what it feels like to be learning something brand new, reflect on your own learning habits and how group dynamics can effect your own experience of learning.

The workshop is on Thursday 6th June, 2pm-5pm at Central Saint Martins, Granary Sq. Kings Cross, London

Book here and follow us at #MMITsonic

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Essential tools and technologies for the library and information professional – video and slides for #AskMmIT19

MmIT hosted their annual webinar on what tools and technologies should librarians and information professionals know about in 2019. We smashed all MmIT webinar records with over 230 professionals attending over the course of the 50 minute session.webinar image

The webinar panel was chaired by Andy Tattersall who was joined by three experts to look at tools and technologies new and old as well as answer questions for the event which had the hashtag #AskMmIT19

The Panelists were Christina Harbour – Anglia Ruskin University @tinalpool Claire Beecroft – University Teacher at the University of Sheffield @beakybeecroft Luke Burton – Digital Development Manager at Newcastle City Council @biblioluke and Andy Tattersall – Information Specialist at the University of Sheffield @Andy_Tattersall

MmIT Chair Alison McNab @AlisonMcNab has created a Wakelet of the event which you can view here

Useful links from the workshop

H5P Resources
There’s a page in the documentation for Canvas: https://h5p.org/documentation/for-authors/h5p-for-canvas
Massachusetts Library created resource guide: http://guides.masslibsystem.org/h5p
Anglia Ruskin University Library Guide https://anglia.libguides.com/readinglists/navigation
Adding images to Padlet https://en-gb.padlet.com/features
MmIT Resources
YouTube
Slideshare

MmIT Webinar – 12th December: Using video in your library and information service

Video is an extremely useful technology for any library or information service. You can use video to help promote your service and your work, deliver teaching and training and help communicate with wider audiences. There are misconceptions that you need lots of money and time to make effective videos, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. Whatever sector you work in we are certain that this webinar will show you how you can apply video in your role. Join the Cilip Special Interest Group Multimedia and Information Technology Group (MmiT) for a one hour webinar to explore some useful tools for making videos and animations to help you make effective use of video technology.

Hashtag for the event #MmITvideo @MultiMediaIT

Register for the event here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/using-video-in-your-library-and-information-service-tickets-52661074692

original

We have three expert speakers for the event.

Claire Sewell (University of Cambridge)

Claire is Research Support Skills Coordinator in the Office of Scholarly Communication in Cambridge where she oversees the professional development of library staff in areas such as copyright, Open Access and research data management. Focusing on the rapidly developing area of scholarly communication Claire develops training initiatives in order to ensure that library staff are best placed to support the research community. As part of her role she also manages the Research Support Ambassador Programme which enhances staff training skills so that they can provide frontline support.

Tweets @ces43

Christina Harbour (Anglia Ruskin University) MmIT Committee member

Christina has worked in libraries since 2003 and received her MA in Information & Library Management from John Moores University in 2007. Christinia’s library experience consists of working in the NHS and academic libraries. From 2006-2012 Christina worked as an Academic Liaison Librarian at Writtle College managing library resources for animal, equine, sport, agriculture and business subjects. This involved collection development, user education and liaising with lecturers.

Christina has since moved over Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford campus to take up the post of Subject Librarian for Business, Health & Education. As we speak I am currently on secondment working as a Project Manager to implement the Reading Lists software from Talis Aspire.

Christina is a member of the Chartered Institute of Library & Information Professionals as well as a CILIP mentor. Christina also works on a freelance basis, recently providing content provision to the JISC Intute service.

Tweets @tinalpool

Kim Donovan (University of Brighton)

Kim Donovan is the Information Adviser for St Peter’s House Library, University of Brighton. In this role, she co-ordinates library support for City Campus and the Schools of Art, Humanities and Media. Teaching Information Literacy is a big part of this role, and Kim is interested in experimenting with new technologies with the aim of enhancing student engagement.

Chairing the webinar

Andy Tattersall (University of Sheffield) Chair of MmIT 

Andy Tattersall is an Information Specialist at The School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) and writes, teaches and gives talks about digital academia, technology, scholarly communications, open research, web and information science, apps, altmetrics and social media. In particular, their application for research, teaching, learning, knowledge management and collaboration. Andy received a Senate Award from The University of Sheffield’ for his pioneering work on MOOCs in 2013 and is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Andy was named in Jisc’s Top 10 Social Media Superstars for 2017. He is also Chair for The Library and Information Association – Multi Media and Information Technology Committee. Andy edited a book on Altmetrics for Facet Publishing which is aimed at researchers and librarians.

Tweets @Andy_Tattersall

Joining Details

Join the live session by clicking the link below:

https://sheffield.adobeconnect.com/mmit

The session takes place in an Adobe Connect webinar – headphones and a microphone are advisable, but the microphone is not essential. You can also join using a tablet or smartphone with the Adobe Connect mobile app.

We look forward to meeting you online soon! If you have trouble joining and the guidance below doesn’t help contact us at scharr-tel@sheffield.ac.uk

Troubleshooting:

If you have never attended an Adobe Connect session, a quick start guide can be found at: http://www.adobe.com/content/dam/Adobe/en/products/adobeconnect/pdfs/VQS_Guide_for_Participants.pdf

Adobe Connect provides an online connection test for troubleshooting connection problems. This tests the four key components for a successful Adobe Connect experience:

  • Flash Player version
  • Network connectivity to the Adobe Connect Server
  • Available bandwidth
  • Acrobat Connect Meeting Add-in version

You can access this test at the following URL:

https://admin.acrobat.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

 

Tech tools for (academic) writing #AcWriMo

November brings academic writing month #AcWriMo as researchers commit to making time to write regularly.   MmIT members would like to suggest a range of digital tools and social spaces are used to encourage other writers and share good practice.  Many of these have applicability beyond academic writing so we hope that you will find them useful.

  • Pat Thomson (University of Nottingham) has written many thought-provoking posts about academic writing on her blog  and also curates useful resources on her Wakelet account.

Keeping focused on your writing:

  • The Yesterbox technique aims to prevent email getting in the way of writing.
  • The Forest App can help cut down on web distraction.
  • The 30:30 App for managing time and increasing productivity.

Mindmap tools (also known as concept mapping tools) help writers formulate a writing plan and sketch out ideas:

Productivity podcasts

Writing clear, understandable text:

  • plain English text checker to make sure your text is easy to read/understand if you are seeking to write for a wider audience.  It can also be used for leaflets, website text, video scripts etc
  •  Paste your text into the Read-o-Meter and it will estimate how long it will take for someone to read it.  A helpful way to encourage clear, readable writing.

Writing2018

Reports on technology trends in higher education and in HE libraries

Two significant reports on technology trends in higher education have been published recently:

  • The 2018 NMC Horizon Report has been published by EDUCAUSE.  The Report identifies and describes the higher education trends, challenges, and developments in educational technology which are likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry.  The 2018 expert panel identified six important developments in technology for higher education (and the likely timescales to adoption): analytics technologies; makerspaces; adaptive learning technologies; artificial intelligence; mixed reality and robotics.
  • Technology and Tomorrow’s Students: how new tools will transform the undergraduate experience is published by The Chronicle.  The focus of this report is on exploring higher education’s use of technology and implications for the future in the key areas of managing data; student enrollment; enriching student advising; and improving career services.

In addition, in June the ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee published their biennial review of the trends and issues affecting academic libraries in higher education: 2018 top trends in academic libraries.  These are: the publisher and vendor landscape; fake news and information literacy; project management approaches in libraries; textbook affordability and OER; learning analytics, data collection, and ethical concerns; research datasets acquisition, text mining, and data science; collection management; acquisition model developments; open access collection development policies and funding schemes; and legacy print collections.

Libraries and free technology – Bargains to be found if you look around and avoid the pitfalls

This post was originally written by Andy Tattersall ahead of his and fellow MmIT committee member Christina Harbour’s participation in the next #uklibchat

cropped-uklibchatskysegoe
https://uklibchat.wordpress.com/

There is the line that you can never have too much of good thing and these days there are so many good things that librarians and information professionals can employ in their working environment. The great thing is that since we emerged from the world of Web 1.0 to 2.0 that a lot of these newer tools are free and actually quite useful. The flipside is that a lot aren’t that good or just can’t be applied in a library setting, regardless of how hard you try and knock a square peg into a round hole, it won’t go (unless the square peg is smaller of course).

Libraries are no different from any kind of organisation, they have to use formally licensed software for the day to day running of their service. Even though this does not always mean the leanest or most dynamic of packages serving your library, but it does mean you will get a good level of service support and that is essential. The smaller, more niche tools have a part to play in this technology ecosystem – just like the microbes and bugs on Planet Earth – if we remove them the whole system would collapse. The larger technology companies often need the smaller companies to keep the environment from becoming stale and predictable. They also can eat them up from time to time, just like our bugs and other real world creatures. Take for example how – at the time independent company – Mendeley changed reference management dramatically for the better. The smaller technology companies are less likely to get bogged down by bloated platforms run by large companies who focus first on foremost in delivering a stable product for their users. Like I say, the stability of large platforms is essential, the flexibility and dynamic nature of smaller technologies is often where the real action is at.

The last ten years has seen a tremendous growth in new technologies that can be applied in a library setting. The financial cost of these tools, such as Canva, Twitter, Adobe Spark and Eventbrite can be free. Yet with freedom can come a cost as problems can start to float to the surface, although not all of these problems are that worrisome. The old adage ‘If you are not paying for the product – you are the product’ certainly rings true with how some technologies will give you a free ride if you give them your data in return. There are also issues around what do you do when you become hooked into a useful platform, but want more from the premium add ons and the person holding the purse strings says no. How do you know whether the tool you are using will be here tomorrow – remember PageFlakes, Storify, Readability, Google Reader and Silk anyone?

Another question for the typical library or information professional is which tools are best and how can they be applied and which will work on their system – take for example a librarian in an NHS setting. The final and most crucial issue is around the investment of time used to master new tools and that can be problematic depending on the learning curve, but if you know how to use Microsoft Word you’ll probably master most lightweight tools in very little time. The sheer number of tools that can be used in the library sector is overwhelming, regardless of whether you are a public, NHS, business or academic librarian. One tool may solve a host of problems for one librarian but be as useful as a chocolate teapot for another. It is all about application and one of the greatest things to see in technology uptake in the library is how one person can use a tool and then another take that same tool and apply it in a totally unexpected way just as successfully. This is the wonderful thing about these technologies, whether it is Menitmeter for polling, Pocket for curating or Piktochart for posters, you you use it may be totally different from how someone else does.

 

MmIT Join #uklibchat Technology in libraries. Monday 3rd September 7.00-8.30pm BST

Join #uklibchat this September with MmIT Chair Andy Tattersall and committee member Christina Harbour to discuss the ever growing and changing topic within Libraries, Technology. cropped-uklibchatskysegoe

We will have a featured post in the next few days, along with some articles (keep an eye on Twitter) for now the Agenda is up and running so please add your questions.

This is open to all sectors of the library profession, so feel free to pop along on Monday the 3rd of September at 7pm, as usual, join in using the #uklibchat hashtag to make your voice heard.