Essential tools and technologies for the library and information professional Webinar – 15th February 2-3pm

We are proud to announce our latest webinar ‘Essential tools and technologies for the library and information professional’

Register your free place here http://bit.ly/2CvjcRJ

https_cdn.evbuc.comimages38699659289349496911originalWhat tools and technologies should you be using as a librarian or information professional in 2018? Join the CILIP special interest group MmIT as we host our yearly webinar to discuss and shortlist the most relevant tools you can employ as part of your work right now. Webinar Chair Leo Appleton is joined by three fellow members of the Multimedia and Information Technology Committee to look at tools and technologies new and old as well as answer any questions you may have.

Join the webinar here: https://sheffield.adobeconnect.com/mmit

You can ask questions in advance via the Twitter hashtag #AskMmIT18 – Tweet us directly on @MultiMediaIT or by going to TodaysMeet Room https://todaysmeet.com/MmITWebinar

Our panelists for the webinar are:
Luke Burton – Digital Transformation Manager at Newcastle City Council

Luke Burton completed his MA in Library and Information Management in 2008 and became a Library and Information Officer with Newcastle Libraries in 2010 as part of their Information and Digital team. He became manager of the Business & IP Centre Newcastle in 2013 and was responsible for co-ordinating and contributing to intellectual property support, business information and business support to small businesses in the North-East. In late 2014 Luke became the Digital Transformation Manager for the Community Hubs, Libraries and Parks within Newcastle City Council where he leads on transformation, development and implementation of digital services within libraries and customer services. In April 2017 he was appointed as the Digital Delivery Manager for the Community Hubs, Libraries and Parks within Newcastle City Council. Luke is particularly interested in copyright, open data, new technologies and culture change within organisations.

Luke tweets as @biblioluke

Virginia Power – Graduate Tutor/PhD researcher at the University of the West of England

Virginia Power is Graduate Tutor/PhD researcher at the University of the West of England. Virginia has over 40 years’ library and information services management experience within educational and cultural heritage sectors. She lectures in Information Management and Science and is also a PhD student in the field of social knowledge management and digital resource curation. Virginia’s particular interest is in technology for learning and open education, specifically the use and re-use of Open Educational Resources (OER) and her PhD is focused on researching the role and impact of social knowledge and narrative in the use and re-use of OER. Virginia specialises in the development of staff digital skills within cultural heritage and corporate knowledge settings. She is also co-editor of eBooks in Libraries: a practical guide published by Facet Publishing.

Virginia tweets as @PowerVirg

Andy Tattersall – Information Specialist at The School of Health and Related Research at The University of Sheffield

Andy Tattersall is an Information Specialist at The School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) and writes, teaches and gives talks about digital academia, technology, scholarly communications, open research, web and information science, apps altmetrics and social media. In particular, their application for research, teaching, learning, knowledge management and collaboration. Andy received a Senate Award from The University of Sheffield’ for his pioneering work on MOOCs in 2013 and is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Andy is also Chair of the CILIP MmIT Committee. He has edited a book on Altmetrics for Facet Publishing which is aimed at researchers and librarians. Andy was named in the Jisc Top Ten Social Media Superstars for 2017.

Andy tweets as @Andy_Tattersall

Chair: Leo Appleton – Director of Library Services, Goldsmiths, University of London.

Leo Tweets as @leoappleton

Responding to social media and online questions

Alison McNab – Academic Librarian at the University of Huddersfield

Alison McNab is an Academic Librarian at the University of Huddersfield whose current focus is on supporting researchers at all stages of the research cycle. She has regularly pioneered the implementation of new technologies and resources, with a focus on their use to enhance service development and delivery, and for much of her career had a specialist focus on the marketing and exploitation of e-content. Her professional interests include accessibility and assistive technologies, current awareness and trend-watching, e-content, information literacy, mobile learning, scholarly communication, and the use of social media by libraries. She has contributed to the wider profession by writing, editing, speaking, and through membership of the management committees of MmIT, UKeiG and the UKSG.

Alison tweets as @AlisonMcNab

Joining Details

Join the live session by clicking the link below:

https://sheffield.adobeconnect.com/mmit

The session takes place in an Adobe Connect webinar – headphones and a microphone are advisable, but the microphone is not essential. You can also join using a tablet or smartphone with the Adobe Connect mobile app.

We look forward to meeting you online soon! If you have trouble joining and the guidance below doesn’t help contact us at scharr-tel@sheffield.ac.uk

Troubleshooting:

If you have never attended an Adobe Connect session, a quick start guide can be found at: http://www.adobe.com/content/dam/Adobe/en/products/adobeconnect/pdfs/VQS_Guide_for_Participants.pdf

Adobe Connect provides an online connection test for troubleshooting connection problems. This tests the four key components for a successful Adobe Connect experience:

  • Flash Player version
  • Network connectivity to the Adobe Connect Server
  • Available bandwidth
  • Acrobat Connect Meeting Add-in version

You can access this test at the following URL:

https://admin.acrobat.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

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Essential tools and technologies for the library and information professional Webinar – 15th May 2-3pm

What tools and technologies should you be using as a librarian or information professional in 2017? Join the CILIP special interest group MmIT as we host our first webinar to discuss and shortlist the most relevant tools you can employ as part of your work right now. We are joined by four members of the Multimedia and Information Technology Committee to look at tools and technologies new and old as well as answer any questions you may have.

Adobe Spark (4)

Register here

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/essential-tools-and-technologies-for-the-library-and-information-professional-tickets-34119534446

Join the live session by clicking the link below:

https://sheffield.adobeconnect.com/mmit

You can ask questions in advance via the Twitter hashtag #AskMmIT17 , tweet us directly on  @MultiMediaIT or by going to TodaysMeet Room   https://todaysmeet.com/MmITWebinar

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Luke Burton

Luke Burton completed his MA in Library and Information Management in 2008 and became a Library and Information Officer with Newcastle Libraries in 2010 as part of their Information and Digital team.  He became manager of the Business & IP Centre Newcastle in 2013 and was responsible for co-ordinating and contributing to intellectual property support, business information and business support to small businesses in the North-East. In late 2014 Luke became the Digital Transformation Manager for the Community Hubs, Libraries and Parks within Newcastle City Council where he leads on transformation, development and implementation of digital services within libraries and customer services. In April 2017 he was appointed as  the Digital Delivery Manager for the Community Hubs, Libraries and Parks within Newcastle City Council. Luke is particularly interested in copyright, open data, new technologies and culture change within organisations.He tweets as @biblioluke

 

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Alison McNab

Alison McNab is an Academic Librarian at the University of Huddersfield whose current focus is on supporting researchers at all stages of the research cycle.   She has regularly pioneered the implementation of new technologies and resources, with a focus on their use to enhance service development and delivery, and for much of her career had a specialist focus on the marketing and exploitation of e-content.  Her professional interests include accessibility and assistive technologies, current awareness and trend-watching, e-content, information literacy, mobile learning, scholarly communication, and the use of social media by libraries.  She has contributed to the wider profession by writing, editing, speaking, and through membership of the management committees of MmIT, UKeiG and the UKSG. She tweets as @AlisonMcNab

 

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Virginia Power

Virginia Power is Graduate Tutor/PhD researcher at the University of the West of England. Virginia has over 40 years’ library and information services management experience within educational and cultural heritage sectors. She lectures in Information Management and Science and is also a PhD student in the field of social knowledge management and digital resource curation. Virginia’s particular interest is in technology for learning and open education, specifically the use and re-use of Open Educational Resources (OER) and her PhD is focused on researching the role and impact of social knowledge and narrative in the use and re-use of OER. Virginia specialises in the development of staff digital skills within cultural heritage and corporate knowledge settings. She is also co-editor of eBooks in Libraries: a practical guide published by Facet Publishing. Virginia tweets as @PowerVirg

 

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Andy Tattersall

Andy Tattersall is an Information Specialist at The School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) and writes, teaches and gives talks about digital academia, technology, scholarly communications, open research, web and information science, apps altmetrics and social media. In particular, their application for research, teaching, learning, knowledge management and collaboration. Andy received a Senate Award from The University of Sheffield’ for his pioneering work on MOOCs in 2013 and is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.  Andy is also Chair of the CILIP MmIT Committee. He has edited a book on Altmetrics for Facet Publishing which is aimed at researchers and librarians. He  tweets as @Andy_Tattersall

 

Register your place here.

 

Join the live session by clicking the link below:

https://sheffield.adobeconnect.com/mmit

The session takes place in an Adobe Connect webinar – headphones and a microphone are advisable, but the microphone is not essential. You can also join using a tablet or smartphone with the Adobe Connect mobile app.

We look forward to meeting you online soon! If you have trouble joining and the guidance below doesn’t help contact us at scharr-tel@sheffield.ac.uk.

 

Troubleshooting:

If you have never attended an Adobe Connect session, a quick start guide can be found at: http://www.adobe.com/content/dam/Adobe/en/products/adobeconnect/pdfs/VQS_Guide_for_Participants.pdf

Adobe Connect provides an online connection test for troubleshooting connection problems. This tests the four key components for a successful Adobe Connect experience:

  • Flash Player version
  • Network connectivity to the Adobe Connect Server
  • Available bandwidth
  • Acrobat Connect Meeting Add-in version

You can access this test at the following URL:

https://admin.acrobat.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

Don’t miss our AGM & half day seminar, 9th January 2017

agm 2017.jpg

More details to follow, but the Multimedia Information Technology Committee of Cilip warmly invite its group members and anyone working in the library and information community to our 2016 AGM and talks.

Theme: Open!

  • Open libraries
  • Open education
  • Open research
  • Open access
  • Open data

A light lunch will br provided and we’ll have four guest speakers on the topic of Open – education, libraries, research, data and access.

Tickets are limited.

Book your FREE PLACE now

A note from the chair – Cloudbusting

A note from the chair on ‘Cloud busting: demystifying ‘the Cloud’ and its impact on libraries’

With just under two weeks to go until our national ‘Cloudbusting’ conference it’s safe to say MmIT is getting quite excited. With such a rich programme and so many great speakers it looks set to be a truly great conference. We hope you are able to join us in Sheffield on April 5th as there are still a few places left.

The concept of ‘the Cloud’ has been around for several years. Over that time the term has become ubiquitous with a general acceptance that ‘the Cloud’ has a definite impact on the way in which we use computers and information technology and how individuals interact with information. It is widely regarded that cloud computing can simplify processes for organisations and save them money and as a result many of the benefits associated with the ‘Cloud’ have been around efficiencies and effectiveness of services.

Many services that libraries have traditionally offered have been migrated into cloud solutions. For example the use of OpenURL providers and federated and pre-indexed search engines allowing users to search all of a library’s collections through a single search box. Discovery layers such as Serials Solutions’ Summon, EBSCO’s EDS or Ex Libris’s Primo Central allow access to all of a library’s collections, not simply those found on the library catalogue. Such discovery layers can provide enhanced service such as access to special collections, digital collections and institutional repositories.

Similarly, the ‘Cloud’ allows libraries to share data about their collections and the bibliographic management activities that they are engaged in. This includes licensing data, common vendor files, serials publications patterns and MARC records.

Add to this entire systems hosted in the Cloud, such as the Koha and Ex Libris Alma library management systems, or reference and citation management systems such as Mendeley, then it is simple to see the impact that the Cloud has on libraries, and indeed vice versa.

Even simple initiatives such as collaborative working through Google Docs, enabling a library community through Facebook or storing photographic collections in Flickr are all examples of how the Cloud has become part of the day to day computing and technology activity of the library.

MmIT strives to raise awareness amongst library and information professionals about current trends and topics in library and information technology and ‘Cloud’ initiatives and innovations, and how they are currently being used within the sector will be of interest to many librarians and information professionals who may not even realise the wealth of ‘Cloud’ activities and solutions available to them. The conference includes a series of workshops, each one focusing on a particular ‘Cloud’ initiative. This includes topics such as implementing Opensource library management systems; How libraries can make the most of mobile devices to access cloud resources; Creating media-rich e-book resources; Implications for research data management; Copyright and licensing issues associated with the ‘Cloud’, and much more. The keynote presentation will be from Karen Blakeman and will focus on search and discovery within the ‘Cloud’ and the conference will also include a series of rapid fire technical innovation presentations and a panel question and answer session.

For further information please see the MmIT Events pages:
http://www.cilip.org.uk/get-involved/special-interest-groups/multimedia/events/pages/default.aspx

KohaCon 2012: open source, community and the LMS

KohaCon 12 - It's all about the people
Photo Some rights reserved by nengard on Flickr

Koha is an increasingly popular open source Library Management System (or Integrated Library System if you prefer) and KohaCon 12 was held at the University of Edinburgh from the 05 – 07 June, with an additional 2 day hackfest immediately following. This was a great event, jam-packed with information for both seasoned Koha users and those just testing the open source waters and with  delegates from all over the world.

The event opened with Paul Poulain (release manager for Koha 3.8.) talking us through all the new features available in the latest version. This is a major release and includes such shiny new functionality as a new staff interface, improved acquisitions and  faster processing.

Nason Bimbe from the British Library for Development Studies talked about their experience in moving a specialist library to Koha from a bespoke system.

Next up (after Elevenses, of course) was Chris Cormack, one of the original Koha developers and most active contributors. Chris talked about the various support mechanisms in place within the Koha community to cultivate an active and diverse community with a low barrier to entry for participation. This is a very newbie-friendly community and help is always available for those interested in getting involved.

Fittingly, next up Paul Poulain gave a demonstration of sandboxes. Sandboxes provide a way for users to get involved in the development process by removing some of the cumbersome technical barriers. There’s more information about the sandboxes on the Koha wiki.

Robin Sheat, who has managed quite a few migrations as a developer at Catalyst IT, lead a discussion on best practices for migrating an existing LMS to Koha and some of the gotchas to watch out for.

Nicole Engard talked gave a big-picture overview of the benefits and barriers to open source, drawn from her experience running training sessions on Koha and FOSS. This gave a nice segue into the panel discussion which covered some of the various ways migration is handled and how the Koha community addresses the barriers to both open source adoption and community participation.

Day two of the conference kicked off with Dianna Roberts from Opus International talking about how they use Koha in a multi-national special library context. Joy Nelson then gave another perspective on migrating a library to Koha from a proprietary LMS. Rafael Antonio followed this by talking about Koha in Portugal and how this fits with the a broader shift towards shared library resources.

Paul Poulain spoke about BibLibre’s experiences of using Mirabel, France’s shared database of journals, reviews and serials, with Koha. Afterwards, Joy Nelson gave another perspective on Koha migrations, focusing on specific migration heuristics

Next it was Marijana Glavica and Dobrica Pavlinušić from Croatia who have developed a way to import approximately 6000 scans of book covers (and the associated metadata) into Koha using their own ‘scrape-cataloguing’ technique.

Nicole Engard spoke about training users new to the Koha software. If you are using or interested in using Koha, it’s worth checking out Nicole’s videos on the ByWater Solutions blog: http://bywatersolutions.com/section/tutorial-videos/

Jane Wagner (Liblime/PTFS), presenting remotely, talking about how to troubleshoot Koha user support and Bob Birchall from Calyx in Australia discussed the importance of governance in ensuring the long-term survival of an open source project. This includes ensuring the software is shared under a suitable licence and that the intellectual property is protected in a sustainable way.

The final presentation of the second day was Adrien Saurat (BibLibre) talking about styling the Koha OPAC, using the SciencesPo Grenoble catalogue as an example.

I wasn’t able to say for the final day of the main conference and so missed some great presentations, including MJ Ray (software.coop and one of the organisers of the conference) talking about the future of Koha and demoes of various new developments, such as SRU, Solr, using a Drupal front-end and the off-line circulation module.

You can find out more about the outcomes from the hackfest on the koha wiki at: http://wiki.koha-community.org/wiki/Kohacon12Hackfest or check out the scoreboard to see how many kittens were saved through collaborative bug squashing.

Links for presentations will be added as they become available.

Open Source news: FOSS4LIB launch and more

In January, LYRASIS Technology Services  launched FOSS4LIB.org, a website to provide guidance to the library community about free/open source software (FOSS). The site already hosts an impressive registry of open source software as well as ‘decision-making tools‘ to help when considering making the move away from proprietary software.There’s more content being added all the time and you can also sign up for an account if you’d like to contribute.

In other OSS news, the Vufind discovery software has just released version 1.3. This latest version includes enhancements such as new search plugins (Europeana search, Google Maps, visual timelines), a ‘book bag’ feature and enhanced RSS feeds.

Kyushu University Library has also announced the release of Cute.Catalog, an Advanced Discovery Service build using eXtensible Catalog. You can see it in action at: http://catalog.lib.kyushu-u.ac.jp/en

 

Coding for Librarians : Applied knowledge is the best kind

There’s been an impressive amount of librarian chatter about Code Year, a new initiative from the people behind Codeacademy. Codeacademy offer free introductory programming tutorials using JavaScript as the language of choice and it looks like this is also the approach Code Year will take. Discussion has already started on Twitter (hashtag #libcodeyear or #catcode) and IRC (#libcodeyear @ Freenode).

JavaScript is often proposed as a starter coding choice, at least in part due to it’s ubiquity (got browser? got JavaScript!). I’m not going to get into a language war, deciding what programming language to start with largely depends on a) what you like and b) what you want to build. And there are plenty of other places you can hear the arguments from every possible angle. It also depends on your own learning style. Don’t get discouraged if one of the tutorials doesn’t work for you, there are plenty others that might fit better with the way you learn. There’s a plethora of courses and learning resources out there, many of which have been listed on the Cat Code wiki.

The best coding tutorials (IMHO) are the ones that help you create something practical and/or applicable to your area of interest. And, with that in mind, I’ve started a list of open source library projects that may be of interest to those getting started with writing code. These projects aren’t necessarily beginner level (many of them aren’t) but provide examples of real code in action and something that you may be able to use and (eventually) contribute to.

Learning JavaScript?

Learning PHP?

Learning Ruby and/or Ruby on Rails?

These are just a few examples which I hope to keep adding to and, of course, suggestions are more than welcome.